2018

CONTRACT EXECUTED

In late 2018, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum was selected by Historic St. Mary’s City following a highly competitive RFP process to build the successor to Maryland Dove, a representation of the 17th century trading ship that accompanied the first settlers to what is now Maryland in 1634.

NAVAL ARCHITECT HIRED

Iver C. Franzen Maritime, LLC, an Annapolis-based firm specializing in historic vessel naval architecture services, was chosen by the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum to design the newest iteration of 17th century pinnace Maryland Dove. Principal architect and firm founder Iver Franzen’s 40-year maritime career has included work both as a naval architect and captain.

 
 

 
 

Early 2019

PROJECT PLANNING

Early in 2019, staff members at CBMM began planning for construction of the new Maryland Dove. This includes sourcing materials for the build, setting a timeline for key assembly highlights, and determining appropriate construction techniques. CBMM also began the process of searching for new shipwrights to join the construction team.

DESIGN REQUIREMENTS DEFINITION

CBMM’s project methodology includes a requirement gathering phase that took place prior to, and ultimately fed into, the naval architecture design process. This important project step included documenting HSMC’s requirements, Coast Guard specifications, existing Maryland Dove design documentation, and other Maryland Dove design needs. One of the goals of the new build is to create a ship that is safe and U.S. Coast Guard certified as a passenger carrying vessel.

SITE PREP

CBMM’s working Shipyard has 25,000 square feet of dedicated working area, including 3,500 square feet of covered shop space. Site preparation includes developing storage for incoming materials and lumber and arranging tooling logically and efficiently for the build process.

 
 

 
 

Spring 2019

VESSEL DESIGN

Vessel design includes reviewing a vast amount of research accomplished since the 1978 Maryland Dove was constructed, including new information regarding the sail plan, fasteners, hardware, cordage, joinery, and lumber scantlings, and what they likely would have been in 1634. The overall size of the vessel will remain similar to the current Maryland Dove, however many of these details will change.

SITE PREP

In spring 2019, shipwrights will transform CBMM’s boatshop floor to a full-size lofting floor on which they can create patterns and draw out their plans for the ship. CBMM’s shipyard was also fitted with a new footbridge over its marine railway.

LUMBER ORDER #1 RECEIVED

The first set of lumber delivered to CBMM includes Southern Live Oak from Georgia, Ash locally sourced from Maryland, and Angelique and Cortez from Suriname. These pieces will be used for the ship’s backbone and frames.

LOFTING & BACKBONE

Lofting will see shipwrights taking a set of measurements for architect’s plans and drawing a boat to full size. From the lofting lines, shipwrights are able to pick up information needed to construct building mold. Shipwrights will also be constructing the major structural components that make up the foundation of the ship like the sternpost, keel, and stem.

 
 
 

Summer 2019

VESSEL DESIGN (continued)

Naval architect Iver Frazen, CBMM shipwrights, and staff members from HSMC will collaborate to finalize details like the ship’s rig, deck structure and electrical components. The ship’s final design will be submitted to the U.S. Coast Guard for approval.

SITE PREP

CBMM’s Shipyard will expand its mezzanine and install a tent off the back of the Boatshop to allow for better viewing for visitors and to shield construction from the elements.

LOFTING & BACKBONE

Lofting will see shipwrights taking a set of measurements for architect’s plans and drawing a boat to full size. From the lofting lines, shipwrights are able to pick up information needed to construct building mold. Shipwrights will also be constructing the major structural components that make up the foundation of the ship like the sternpost, keel, and stem.

 
 
 
 

Fall
2019

VESSEL DESIGN (completed)

The ship’s design will be completed by naval architect Iver Franzen and approved the by U.S. Coast Guard.

BACKBONE CONSTRUCTION

Shipwrights will have the backbone raised vertically to accept frames, which will stick out like the ribs of the ship.

FRAME CONSTRUCTION

Frames (futtocks) extend thwartships, or out to the side, of the ship, creating the shape of its hull. In the fall, shipwrights will start to construct these large pieces.

 
 
 
 

BACKBONE ERECTED

The backbone will stand upright, allowing visitors to begin the see the shape of the new Maryland Dove.

FRAME CONSTRUCTION

The first futtocks will be attached to the ship’s backbone, giving the ship more of its final shape.

Winter 2019

 
 
 
 

FRAME CONSTRUCTION & INSTALLATION

Additional frames (futtocks) will be attached to the ship’s backbone.

Early 2020

 
 
 
 

FRAME CONSTRUCTION & INSTALLATION

Additional frames (futtocks) will be attached to the ship’s backbone.

WALES, STRINGERS & PLANKING

Planks of various sizes running both inside and outside the ship will be attached to the futtocks to create strength and the shape of the ship.

Spring 2020

 
 
 
 

 

Summer 2020

DECK FRAMING & PLANKING

Shipwrights will construct and attach frames (which are then covered with planks) to the topside of the ship, where the crew will stand while sailing.

LUMBER ODER #2 RECEIVED

In summer 2020, CBMM expects to receive additional Douglas Fir from Washington and white oak to be used in the construction of deck frames, decking and spars.

RIGGING

CBMM’s lead rigger will begin to work on the new Maryland Dove’s spars and standing rigging.

 
 
 

WALES, STRINGERS & PLANKING

Planks of various sizes running both inside and outside the ship will be attached to the futtocks to create strength and the shape of the ship.

RIGGING

CBMM’s lead rigger will continue work on the new Maryland Dove’s spars and standing rigging.

ENGINES & SYSTEMS

CBMM’s marine mechanic will outfit the new Maryland Dove with twin high quality and efficiency diesel engines with gauges and controls and self-feathering propellers; an electronic suite for navigation, communication, and safety; galley; head; and lighting for below deck and navigation.

DECK FRAMING & PLANKING

Shipwrights will construct and attach frames (which are then covered with planks) to the topside of the ship, where the crew will stand while sailing.

Fall
2020

 
 
 
 

WALES, STRINGERS & PLANKING

Planks of various sizes running both inside and outside the ship will be attached to the futtocks to create strength and the shape of the ship.

RIGGING

CBMM’s lead rigger will continue work on the new Maryland Dove’s spars and standing rigging.

ENGINES & SYSTEMS

CBMM’s marine mechanic will continue outfitting Maryland Dove with twin high quality and efficiency diesel engines with gauges and controls and self-feathering propellers; an electronic suite for navigation, communication, and safety; galley; head; and light for below deck and navigation.

DECK FRAMING & PLANKING

Shipwrights will continue work on attaching frames (which are then covered with planks) to the topside of the ship, where the crew will stand while sailing.

FINISH WORK

As construction of Maryland Dove nears completion, shipwrights will begin to work on final details like the ship’s interior berths, caulking, and painting.

Winter 2020

 
 
 
 

RIGGING

CBMM’s lead rigger will move on to creating Maryland Dove’s running rigging and a fresh set of sails will be bent (or fastened) to their stays or yards.

ENGINES & SYSTEMS

CBMM’s marine mechanic will continue to outfit Maryland Dove with twin high quality and efficiency diesel engines with gauges and controls and self-feathering propellers; an electronic suite for navigation, communication, and safety; galley; head; and light for below deck and navigation.

DECK FRAMING & PLANKING

Shipwrights will continue work on attaching frames (which are then covered with planks) to the topside of the ship, where the crew will stand while sailing.

FINISH WORK

As construction of Maryland Dove nears completion, shipwrights will continue work on final details like the ship’s interior berths, caulking, and painting.

LAUNCH

The new Maryland Dove will go into water for the first time in early 2021. After being launched, the final stages of construction will be done with the ship in the water.

Early 2021

 
 
 
 

RIGGING

CBMM’s lead rigger will finalize work on Maryland Dove’s running rigging and a fresh set of sails will be bent (or fastened) to their stays or yards.

ENGINES & SYSTEMS

CBMM’s marine mechanic will continue to outfit the new Maryland Dove with twin high quality and efficiency diesel engines with gauges and controls and self-feathering propellers; an electronic suite for navigation, communication, and safety; galley; head; and light for below deck and navigation.

Spring 2021

 
 
 
 

ENGINES & SYSTEMS

CBMM’s marine mechanic will finalize work on the new Maryland Dove’s twin high quality and efficiency diesel engines, gauges and controls and self-feathering propellers; electronic suite for navigation, communication, and safety; galley; head; and light for below deck and navigation.

SEA TRIALS & STABILITY TESTING

Before final delivery, Maryland Dove will undergo rigorous testing to ensure the vessel heads home to Historic St. Mary’s City ready to sail.

Summer 2021

 
 
 
 

SEA TRIALS & STABILITY TESTING

Before final delivery, Maryland Dove will undergo rigorous testing to ensure the vessel heads home to Historic St. Mary’s City ready to sail.

FINAL DELIVERY

CBMM will deliver a historically accurate and functional replacement to Maryland Dove to Historic St. Mary’s City in the fall of 2021.

Fall
2021